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20121223
20121223
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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
have my two science leaders, [inaudible] and janet gray, so science questions galor, they can handle them all, policy questions, we'll have to deflect some of those to nancy for another time, so what i'm going to present today is what we call our healthy home and healthy world tours, i'll talk a little bit about who the breast cancer fund is and then we're going to walk through kind of the rooms in your home talking about tips for avoiding exposures that are linked to breast cancer and i will talk a little bit about the different chemicals, where they're found, things you can do to avoid them and also some policies, and then we'll kind of go beyond the home to talk about the kinds of exposures that might be not within our control in the house but elsewhere. and it looks like i have videos so that is good. so, the breast cancer fund is a national organization that works to prevent breast cancer by eliminating the environmental exposures linked o the disease, mostly we talk about chemicals and radiation that are linked to breast cancer, we are a little different from your breast cancer
>> i believe so, is that true? yes, my science advisors, that's why they're here. >> [inaudible]. >> yeah. there are a lot of carcinogens in diesel exhaust, yeah. >> [inaudible]. >> well, you're still seeing an oil that combusts, some of them we know burn more cleanly than others but if it's combusting, you end up with productions of combustion, it may not be better for pollution on the other side, depending on how clean the air burns and that's a theme we end up talking about a fair bit unfortunately is that bio doesn't always mean it's safer, it can, it can definitely mane we're reducing destruction of greenhouse gases but it can still make bad things outs of good ingredients if you know what i mean, another outdoor thing is to reduce your reliance on household pesticides so the active ingredients can be of concern, the pesticide itself, but most pesticide companies done label what are called the inert ingredient, that's the one that's not doing the pest killing per se, they can still really be bad chemicals, endocrine sdrukt tersest can be there, your baby crawls on your lawn
technological surprises from harming national security. the life science pros jects are rooted in military needs like meeting the threat of microbes or treating brain injury in the battlefield but they promise to transform civilian medicine. darpa specializes in high reward research. many of its projects sound like science fiction. when completed isu
health and safety information on chemicals, would use the best science to assess safety, so not old science but new science, would seek to protect vulnerable populations like we talked about way back when, right, prenatally and in pregnancy, those ones that are maybe more vulnerable to chemical exposures and also to reduce exposures in communities with unfair burden of exposures, we know that very often, poor communities, communities of color, communities with less resources are exposed to higher levels of chemicals so we have to reduce that unfair burden because they already have enough unfair burden, so that calls for some comprehensive changes and we want to see those happen. the senate is not likely to reconvene and vote on this bill because we are winding down of course with this legislative session and this particular administration in terms of senates turning over, they're all -- most of them are up for re-election, house is turning over -- about half of them are up for re-election and of course presidential election as well, and so it is very likely of course that this will
and they will feel the love. science shows if you look at the stars tonight just imagine think that is hundreds of billions of light years away and many are gone and do not exist but the energy and lightbulb body gives of goes on forever generations yet unborn feel that light we may have a finite time of eris but every single day we should burn s bright and as more and brilliant as possible. those elected the state's elected officials and has been fueled with a conspiracy of love. i and my father had a lot of colorful things he would say about me as a kid he would say jokingly don't walk around in here like you hit a triple. i was a po. [laughter] you were born on third base. >> bid-rigging from the wells of freedom and opportunity that we did not take part of that gives us an obligation to give back in every way possible to see it is a secret to live life of joy and solace and love. [applause] >> we want to thank the mayor for being with us for any questions. >> one of my concerns. [inaudible] it just seems to be the government wish to be doing something. not necessarily a european system but
in terms of charter schools, in terms of focusing on stem -- the science technology, engineering, and math. things that will transform american education which will transform the american economy. >> this is a very good point. and a lot of, right now, across theountry seeing certain areas become rewired for what you're talking about, technology and science. gentlemen, thank you very much. >> thank you. >> great to have you on the program. charles bronfman and jeffrey saloms solom solomon. >>> up next, the news that will have an impact on your money and what autton wood tree and ice what autton wood tree and ice have in common. >>> we have some big news to tell you about beginning in january we will have a new home. look for "on the money with maria bartiromo." we will exciting new segments for, you great guests and, of course, i will be here as well. join news january. first, look at the stories coming up in the week ahead that may move the market and impact your money this week. monday is a shortened trading trade on wall street. the noshl stock exchange and nasdaq is closing early for ch
to have this in our mind. >> so this is a chapter in the book called the science of interfaith cooperation. and one of the things that i think is -- as interfaith cooperation grows and, by the way, if i was in the private sector, i would say buy interfaith, right? [laughter] it's, i think, like human rights or like environmentalism, it's a field that's going to grow dramatically. if you read any newspaper, you're going to see a lot of blood between the black and the white, right? and there's an unfortunate or amount of that blood that is done to the soundtrack of prayer. just to give you one example of this, one of the -- the question that people are focusing on when it comes to the transitions of muslim countries towards democracy and market economies are generally about governance and about economics. but frankly, there's a third key question as well, and that is can the christians and the muslims of egypt, can thal weets and -- alawites and shias, can they build societies together? can the kurds and the sunnis and shias of iraq, right? this is a question of how different sects and relig
near the museum and the california academy of sciences, the garden was designed by the california spring blossom and wildfilower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil garden along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. stroll around and appreciate its unique setting. the gorgeous brick walkway and a brick wall, the stone benches, the rustic sundial. chaired the part -- share the bard's word hundred famous verses from a shakespearean plays. this is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, and enjoy the sunshine, and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare and floats you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. take a bus and have no parking worries. shakespeares' garden is ada accessible. located at the bottom of this hill, it is a secret garden with an infinite in captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, it makes the top of our list for most intimate pyknic setting. avoid all taurus cars and hassles by taking a cable car. or the 30
them one by one disappear. >> this is sort of a merger between art and science and advocacy in a funny way getting people to wake unand realize what is going on -- wake up and realize what is going on. so it is a memborial trying to get us to interpret history and look to the past. they have always been about lacking at the past so we proceed forward and maybe don't commit the same mistakes. ♪ >> our concern is they are going to be here for a couple of days and everybody is going to have a great time. and we have three days of them and 362 days of everybody else using the park. ♪ ♪ >> this is the fifth year of our partnership with another planet entertainment, where another planet puts on probably the greatest music festival in america for three days here in golden gate park. >> we work with them a lot to prevent and not have any problems. and what we have done with them is have roads built and have pieces under whatever equipment is parked. they do all of that. and then when it gets removed, they have very little damage. >> for me as a gardener and having to stay here and work a
is an unabashed liberal, but she's on tv. i think she has a phd in something, like lyrical science or some thing. i think charles murray would not want to be called a pundit. he's famous for the controversy over the bell curve. this looks that great working-class to separate classroom raise which complicates everything. you look at how the values of the working class has gone down hill and is a way to alleviate, adopted middle-class values while the working middle class is a complex argument. two places to describe these things. it's an interesting, provocative book, somewhat more than someone ranting and rallying. >> host: charles murray is a scholar at the american enterprise institute as well. probably not fair to call him a political pundit. he launched his own imprint, but his talk show is off the air. can you see the result in his sales? >> guest: as far as i can tell, glenn beck, what he's been doing since he left fox is trying to build a brand that reaches a very dedicated community, not only through a satellite oriented radio show. he is a new site called the police. he has other things
have to do is look at what works. this is not rocket science. i came to washington as a novice in politics, believing in the power of ideas, seeing how ideas can revolutionize different industries, can create new products and services meeting the needs of customers everywhere. and that's what i hoped we could do here in washington. maybe naively i went to work in the house, often working with the heritage foundation to create a better product here in washington. i saw social security, and not many people look below the surface, but we knew it was going broke. we knew we were taking in money that people were paying for this social security retirement benefit, but we were spending it all. and i thought, what an opportunity it would be for future generations, for my children, if we actually saved what people were putting into social security for their retirement. and you didn't have to do too much math to see that even for middle-class workers that americans could be millionaires when they retired if we even kept half of what was put into social security for them. it seemed like a
there is no such thing as an abortion to protect a woman's life or health due to "advances in science and technology." and missouri rep. todd akin's infamous remark about women's bodies shutting down to prevent pregnancy in cases of so-called "legitimate rape." stunned lots of women voters. as a result many voters told pollsters women's rights were a concern. in the end the women's vote went solidly for president obama as opposed to gop challenger mitt romney. and none of the three men who made strange statements about women's bodies won their races. on capitol hill the election brought the total number of women in the senate to 20, 16 democrats and four republicans, and 78 women in the house, 58 democrats, 20 republicans. as budget negotiations continued to loom, women were asked whether having equal female representation in congress would have changed things. >> we would have dealt with that. it's critical to the country. we need to provide certainty for businesses for our families. so they will know what they're looking at over the next year and again as women i think we tend to be consensus buil
personal study. beyond science, different perspective on the industry. >> who are your heroes in the tech area? >> steve jobs i told myself to program. read a biography and got into teaching myself programming.
the way scientists test new medicines all at the same time. health and science reporter carolyn johnson explains. >> the doctor believes she's zebra fish to light the way to major drug discoveries. >> the big breakthrough was to use the firefly protein which gives a strong light signal. >> he and his colleagues are part of an international team that's using the zebra fish to screen potential treatments for conditions ranging from obesity to diabetes. they have attached a genetic light switch to a pathway associated the production of glucose or blood sugar. >> meaning when the fish produce glucose in the liver, the light shines up. >>> the result is a fish that can be used as a living, swimming litmus test. the green flow seen in this video is not only visible to researchers, it's also measurable. a brighter lights indicates a higher level of glucose, used as a barometer in research. as one study they zeroed in a potential obesity drug after screening nearly 2500 candidates using the genetically modified fish. >> we put three fish in and add the drug compounds like one per well so we can
we get there, god only knows. >> i actually still think we can get it done. >> the science from the nra. >> blood-soaked films out there. violent video games. the national media machine. the only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun. >>> and a new pick for secretary of state.
in social context of not understanding social science, of not understanding that the behaviors that someone may be doing are bullying and are not friendship. so they're very at risk. >> host: and you describe in the book that kids with special needs, um, for them bullying is really a pandemic. it's that prevalent. >> guest: yeah. absolutely. >> host: uh-uh -- uh-huh. >> guest: one of the things aside from kids with autism, kids with learning disabilities, kids with dyslexia, we have an essay by joe pantaliano who talks a bit about having gone through his adolescence and there being kind of bullying all over the place, and it coming out in different ways in his community but realizing later in life that he's, um, disselectsic. and i think a lot of adults will now, now that i think we have a lot of awareness about learning disabilities, will look back on their time going through middle school, going through high school where they were considered to be stupid or not intelligent for what we now understand is a learning disability. >> host: and just to clarify for the viewers, um, who's joe pant
. and even scientifically. the japanese get their religion, can see how far advanced, in the sciences. the chinese can be a religion still today. they did flirt with a religion called communism for a number of years, but only became capitalists and doing well because basically they are rooted in cultures, and from the cultures you evolve all -- so i agree with you absolutely. and one which i forgot to mention was a -- when the slaves went to the americas and they found themselves being banned from studying -- from following their religion. so what they did is said, yes, master, we won't follow our religion but substituted the same for the deities. so until today you'll find st. lazareth. one of the healing sins, st. anthony, the lady of the candles, et cetera, et cetera. they went through that phase, and even evolved a means of re-creating images of their deities in slightly stylized mode so that they could claim that those figures stood for the things and that is how accomplished they were in creating human beings. still today you find this phase existing but also there was another p
've been doing personal study. the thing that help me build it beyond science, different perspective on the industry. >> who are your heroes in the tech area? >> steve jobs i told mf
, look, i had high school science teachers who can't negotiate a bunsen burner for goodness sake. i wouldn't suggest that we necessarily give everybody a gun, it's not for everybody. but how we deal with it in utah is going to be way different than how we deal with it in chicago. >> david, one thing that came out of your interview they've thought was interesting that the nra i didn't think would ever be on, he was calling for forcing states to participate more. if you're the obama administration and you're looking for the nra's help on something, well, forcing states to participate more on the background checks, all of these things that aren't happening, if the nra is going to do that and force these conservative republicans governors to sign legislation that did that, that would be a step. >> andrea, i want to talk about the second term cabinet. chuck hagel did not get a ringing endorsement from senator schumer or -- >> what senator schumer said was really very revealing. if a democratic senator is not going to come to chuck hagel's defense, i think there is serious problems there.
? >> how we get there, god only knows. >> i actually still think we can get it done. >> the science from the nra. >> blood-soaked films out there. violent video games. the national media machine. the only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun. >>> and a new pick for secretary of state. our headliner this morning, the nra's new point person on school shootings, asa hutchinson. then the senate debate with republican johnny isakson and democrat amy klobuchar. plus our powerhouse roundtable with newark mayor cory booker, anti-tax activist and nra board member grover norquist, peggy noonan of "the wall street journal" and katrina vanden heuvel from "the nation." >>> hello, again. the president and congress are off for christmas fleeing a capitol filled with political rancor and political dysfunction. fiscal cliff talks have completely collapsed. questions about the president's new national security team has forced him to announce the appointments piecemeal and the nra's first response to the tragedy in newtown provoked a fierce debate. we'll cover that starting with t
. i have what science calls the nightly stuffy nose thing. i can't breathe, so i can't sleep. and the next day i pay for it. i tried decongestants... i tossed and turned... i even vaporized. and then i fought back with drug-free breathe right. these nasal strips instantly open my nose, like a breath of fresh air. i was breathing and sleeping better. [ female announcer ] exercise your right to breathe right. get two free strips at breatheright.com. hey it's your right to breathe right. >> osgood: 'tis the season for "a christmas story. the 1983 film in which this rather unusual lamp played a memorable role. now the story is being retold on broadway. mo rocca sets the stage. >> reporter: if "a miracle on 34th street --" >> christmas isn't just a day it's a frame of mine. >> reporter: -- and "it's a wonderful life --" >> merry christmas you wonderful old building and loan! >> reporter: -- are the frankincense and mir of christmas movies then the gold may very well be -- >> a triple dog dare you! >> reporter: -- 1983's a christmas story. >> jeff! jeff! >> reporter: if you hav
science cure. we find these cures and new procedures to research. doctors need to be paid, hospitals need to be paid, research needs to be undertaken. i believe the president has done a great distance on the fiscal cliff to get to $400,000. he has talked about cutting programs that deal with the most vulnerable people, the poorest, on social security tax increases, which i oppose. cost of living increases, excuse me. the president has tried. i hope this bill fails and we deal with the president in a responsible way and avoid the fiscal and the physical cliff. >> thank you. i yield one minute to the member of the appropriations committee, our hard-working friend from georgia and his father. >> the gentleman is recognized for one minute. >> the president owns this economy. he owns the high unemployment rate, the 23 million americans who are under or unemployed. he owns the lack of jobs and opportunity. he owns the $750 billion annual deficit. it is time for the president to step up. knowing this fiscal cliff was going to take place for well over a year, the president has not acted in good f
on polling science them raw emotion from a campaign during battle. there was a sense among republicans that chris christie had stabbed him in the back. what's interesting about these candidates to do the crossover move is they tend to alienate the base and they tend to lose their effectiveness of a party that they cross over to. in recent days, talking to people in the senate you actually feel that his support for the $60 billion request for 70 relief is hurting them with republicans. things move on rather quickly in politics. host: there are lingering peelings that he did not do what romney expected with the keynote address. he said he said that today and a half before and they did not change anything. guest: there's a lot of grumbling when it comes to chris christie. a lot of them felt he cared more about himself than governor romney. he was not a staff favorite, to put it mildly. when the grumbling that took place after the hurricane, he said he understood because he has been a governor and he needs to concentrate on his staff. a lot of them more deeply angry about his embrace. pres
science with five healthy alternatives to get energy that will keep you out of the hospital and keep you energetic. nice to see you. >> thank you. good morning. >> you have a company out of annapolis. >> that's correct. i have developed a company to focus on natural rather than the synthetic products on the market place. >> let's talk about some of the tips you have in terms of getting the energy that you need. >> water. water is very basic. 70% of the population is dehydrated. it can cause one to become he thar jik. you want to drink about eight 8 ounce glasses of water a day. >> i keep hearing that number fluctuates. >> it does. it depends on your activity level and the size of your body, too. >> okay. so water. number one. and then you have your product that can go into the water. >> it is a great way to deliver tasty vitamins. actually, i have created it to encourage one to drink more water. b vitamins. minerals. all support natural energy levels. >> you also talk about caffeine. we just did that story about caffeine. >> exactly. well, caffeine. everyone wants a cup of morning coffee
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)